Prevention specialists want to do more to educate the community

During the 2024 National Prevention Week, May 12-18, Rosecrance prevention specialists are aiming to engage with the community and equip them with the necessary tools to avoid addiction.

The prevention staff at Rosecrance has been conducting thorough research on various topics to present during the upcoming National Prevention Week virtual event, scheduled for May 14 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The goal is to connect with community members directly and provide them with the latest insights and information to make informed decisions about preventing addiction.

“We want to stress how important prevention is. At times, prevention may be overlooked, but it’s important to get that education out there early,” said Haley Dziedzic, a prevention specialist for Rosecrance Jackson Centers.

Join the virtual event on May 14 to learn about fetal alcohol and THC exposure, kratom, alcohol misuse and its impact on the body, the stigma associated with substance use disorders, and the facts about THC use.

Rosecrance prevention specialists in Iowa collaborate with 17 counties to develop tailored prevention plans that address the specific needs of their communities. Their focus is on reducing the harmful effects of alcohol, opioids, cannabis, and gambling by implementing evidence-based strategies.

The prevention team delivers prevention education through presentations, consulting, and media campaigns. They also collaborate with schools, healthcare providers, casinos, local nonprofit organizations, and community clubs and organizations to expand prevention efforts in the communities they serve.

“By collaborating with these organizations, we can share our knowledge, expertise, and resources to create a better understanding of mental health and substance use disorders,” Dziedzic said. “These partnerships help to spread awareness and education, which can lead to better outcomes for individuals and their communities.”

Rosecrance offers a range of evidence-based programs and training to educate community members. These programs provide information about mental health and substance use in schools and community settings, and they are supported by state and local grant funding. The compassionate staff who support and run the prevention programs reach out to thousands of children, teens, young adults, adults, and families each year.